A True Roux

J0386420  

"A Roux is a paste of butter and flour that is used to thicken almost everything in Western cooking. A white roux is the base for white, or cream sauces, such as sauce béchamel, used with chicken, vegetables and fish. A brown roux is the base for much cajun creole cooking and for many rich casseroles."Cooksrecipes.com

The time allowed for the cooking determines the basic flavor and color of the roux. What is necessary to remember is that the roux can burn very easily. Simply start with 1/2 a stick of butter and melt it and then add some  saucing flour. You will know when you have the correct amount of flour , as the roux will have a sheen to it, but will not be a lumpy paste. Stir the roux with a fork or a small whisk the entire time to keep lumps from forming. Then just keep whisking occasionally while the roux cooks. It will get darker as it cooks, and depending on the type of sauce that you are creating you'll need to watch for it's doneness. I use a roux as the base for almost everything from cheese sauce and soup to gravy. It's a wonderful technique to learn and it only takes a couple of tries to perfect. When the roux is done, the  liquid ingredients are added to it, (cream, milk, broth etc.) and the flavouring ingredients (cheese, seasonings,meat ,vegetables etc.) are added last.


A True Roux

J0386420  

"A Roux is a paste of butter and flour that is used to thicken almost everything in Western cooking. A white roux is the base for white, or cream sauces, such as sauce béchamel, used with chicken, vegetables and fish. A brown roux is the base for much cajun creole cooking and for many rich casseroles."Cooksrecipes.com

The time allowed for the cooking determines the basic flavor and color of the roux. What is necessary to remember is that the roux can burn very easily. Simply start with 1/2 a stick of butter and melt it and then add some  saucing flour. You will know when you have the correct amount of flour , as the roux will have a sheen to it, but will not be a lumpy paste. Stir the roux with a fork or a small whisk the entire time to keep lumps from forming. Then just keep whisking occasionally while the roux cooks. It will get darker as it cooks, and depending on the type of sauce that you are creating you'll need to watch for it's doneness. I use a roux as the base for almost everything from cheese sauce and soup to gravy. It's a wonderful technique to learn and it only takes a couple of tries to perfect. When the roux is done, the  liquid ingredients are added to it, (cream, milk, broth etc.) and the flavouring ingredients (cheese, seasonings,meat ,vegetables etc.) are added last.


The Best Whipped Cream Ever!

copperbowlThis is one of my favorite recipes! I discovered one night that whisking organic heavy cream in a copper bowl produced a whipped cream unlike anything that I'd ever experienced! Unknown to me was the fact that the French have been enjoying their cream this way for many years! It's surprisingly simple, and you can flavour the cream in so many different ways depending upon what you're serving it with! I am particularly fond of infusing the cream with lavender essence and honeyand serving it over chilled poached pears! For some reason, the copper bowl helps to create whipped cream of an incredible consistency. It's definitely not as wonderful in a steel bowl, and a lot less romantic! The recipe is simple....take a pint of good,organic whipping cream and begin to whisk it in the bowl...pay attention as it can turn to butter quickly! If this happens don't despair, it's delicious butter! When the cream is the correct consistency, add the flavorings to taste!


The Best Whipped Cream Ever!

copperbowlThis is one of my favorite recipes! I discovered one night that whisking organic heavy cream in a copper bowl produced a whipped cream unlike anything that I'd ever experienced! Unknown to me was the fact that the French have been enjoying their cream this way for many years! It's surprisingly simple, and you can flavour the cream in so many different ways depending upon what you're serving it with! I am particularly fond of infusing the cream with lavender essence and honeyand serving it over chilled poached pears! For some reason, the copper bowl helps to create whipped cream of an incredible consistency. It's definitely not as wonderful in a steel bowl, and a lot less romantic! The recipe is simple....take a pint of good,organic whipping cream and begin to whisk it in the bowl...pay attention as it can turn to butter quickly! If this happens don't despair, it's delicious butter! When the cream is the correct consistency, add the flavorings to taste!